Start Example of radiometric dating

Example of radiometric dating

In other words there was originally 4 parts per million Parentium-123 and 0 parts per million Daughterium-123.

Radiometric dating methods are the strongest direct evidence that geologists have for the age of the Earth.

All these methods point to Earth being very, very old -- several billions of years old.

We could be sure that a mineral containing parentium originally had no daughterium.

If the mineral contained 1 part per million Parentium-123 and 3 parts per million Daughterium-123, we could be sure all the Daughterium-123 was originally Parentium-123.

I found several good sources, but none that seemed both complete enough to stand alone and simple enough for a What is radiometric dating?

Simply stated, radiometric dating is a way of determining the age of a sample of material using the decay rates of radio-active nuclides to provide a 'clock.' It relies on three basic rules, plus a couple of critical assumptions.

If we knew the fraction of a radioactive element still remaining in a mineral, it would be a simple matter to calculate its age by the formula To determine the fraction still remaining, we must know both the amount now present and also the amount present when the mineral was formed.

Contrary to creationist claims, it is possible to make that determination, as the following will explain: By way of background, all atoms of a given element have the same number of protons in the nucleus; however, the number of neutrons in the nucleus can vary.

Furthermore, Parentium and Daughterium are so different in chemical properties that they don't otherwise occur together.

If there were such a pair of isotopes, radiometric dating would be very simple.

It has the same number of protons, otherwise it wouldn't be uranium.