Start Dating china patterns

Dating china patterns

the WEDGWOOD mark is found on useful wares between 17 and on all wares produced thereafter until the sans serif version of the mark was introduced in 1929It was in 1769 that he formed two partnerships, Wedgwood and Bentley produced decorative ware with his good friend, Thomas Bentley.

The only way to gain an appreciation of the character of Old Wedgwood is to examine it, with the eye and with the finger tips.

It is impossible to convey that quality in either words or photographs.

Robert Allen handpainted wares were never produced in large quantities and many were never repeated.

The dates given below give a close approximation of when the designs were produced.

Doulton continued, intially, to use the base marks of PINDER BOURNE & CO and/or the initials P. Together with some additional hints that may help with dating your Doulton pottery, porcelain and stoneware. The figurine was therefore produced in 1937 The following numbers indicate the approximate date range or period when the marked item was first introduced.

There is an old rule of thumb for dating Doulton figurines; where you add 27 to the small and hardly visable number to the right of the Doulton backstamp. That is not to say that your item was produced in that year but simply that the year indicated is the earliest the piece could have been produced.

Factors other than the Doulton mark can help in more accurate dating, particularly pattern names and numbers and date codes or artists monograms. Several other Doulton marks occur in the very early stages and incorporate pattern names such as ROUEN and KEW, with some remaining in use for up to twenty years.

Between 18, Henry and James Doulton acquired a major interest in the Pinder Bourne factory in Nile Street, Burlsem and changed the name to Doulton & Company, Burlsem. The following tables contain a selection of the most commonly used BURSLEM and LAMBETH ware marks.

In the late 1700s Worcester were among the first to use the Bute shape for teabowls, tea cups and coffee cups.

The presence of the crescent mark dates these items to the Dr Wall period and they are all very similar in shape, size and decoration to those made in the same period by Caughley.

From 1862 until 1867 the last two numbers of the year would be used.