Start Carbon dating shroud of turin

Carbon dating shroud of turin

In 2002, a team of experts did restoration work, such as removing the patches from 1534 and replacing the backing cloth.

Both are revered as relics, and each bears the name of the city where it currently resides. It is a fine linen cloth, measuring 14.5 feet by 3.5 feet, and mysteriously displays a finely detailed negative photographic image — front and back, head to toe, of an anatomically correct man who appears to have been tortured, beaten, and crucified.

Preliminary results of NBT analyses carried out on new and aged linen fibres illustrate some information that could be gained when using NBT on the Turin Shroud.

ABSTRACT: In the early '80s, evidence was provided that, rather than a dye (red okra), hemoglobin was indeed responsible for the alleged blood stains of the Turin Shroud.

Note that, in their accounts of Christ’s suffering and death on the cross, all four Gospels mention a “fine linen cloth.” Perhaps it is a coincidence, but clearly seen on the body of the crucified man in the Shroud are gruesome markings consistent with the Gospel accounts of Christ’s Passion.