Start Corporation liquidating trust

Corporation liquidating trust

By establishing a liquidating trust pursuant to section 1123(b)(3) in a confirmed plan of reorganization or liquidation, a debtor can transfer causes of action and other assets to a trust, for future liquidation and distribution to the debtor’s creditors, and avoid delaying plan confirmation.

In conjunction with the other provisions of the Bankruptcy Code that require a disclosure statement and plan to provide “adequate information” for a claim or interest holder to make an informed judgment about the plan, Section 1123(b)(3) effectively provides notice to creditors of retention and prospective enforcement of claims that may enlarge the estate’s assets for distribution.

A plan must expressly retain claims to preserve a liquidating trust’s standing to pursue them after plan confirmation.

He is the founder of North Country Capital, an investment and advisory firm where he currently serves as President. Doheny served as a Managing Director and helped lead the Distressed Products Group of Deutsche Bank Securities Inc. Prior to Deutsche Bank, he was a bankruptcy attorney in the corporate reorganization groups of Orrick and Kelley Drye. Doheny currently serves on the boards of YRC Worldwide Inc, Affinity Gaming, Arcapita Inc (RA Holdings) and Eastman Kodak Inc. After his time at Price Waterhouse, he served as a Senior Managing Director at FTI Consulting. Weber has served on the Contra Costa Civil Grand Jury, performed occasional independent consulting projects and assumed board/trustee positions. Weber currently serves on Board of Directors of winery Truett Hurst, Inc., and chairs the audit committee.

Previously, he was a Managing Director and Co-Head of Special Situations Trading at HSBC Securities, where he headed up credit research. Doheny was a portfolio manager at Fintech Advisory Inc., a hedge fund focusing on undervalued securities and turnarounds in the U. He received a BA from Allegheny College and a Juris Doctor from Cornell Law School. The Res Cap Liquidating Trust was established in December 2013 under the Second Amended Joint Chapter 11 Plan of Residential Capital, LLC, et al.

Absent this provision, a debtor would be required to investigate and prosecute all avoidance and other causes of action prior to confirming a plan, which may take years.

Section 1123(b) (3) of the Bankruptcy Code facilitates the use of a liquidating trust for prompt administration of the estate by providing post-confirmation standing to an appointed representative of the estate to enforce claims and interests.

Liquidating trusts can be effective tools to wind down any business enterprise, including debtors in Chapter 11 bankruptcy cases and entities that dissolve outside of bankruptcy. To that end, in a Chapter 11 case, a debtor’s exclusive right to file a plan is limited to 120 days (subject to extensions for cause), but once a plan is confirmed, the bankruptcy estate ceases to exist and the debtor loses its status as debtor in possession, including its authority to act as a bankruptcy trustee and pursue estate claims.

Norton Liquidating trusts are organized for the primary purpose of liquidating assets transferred to them for distribution to trust beneficiaries. The US Bankruptcy Code seeks to promote the effective administration and settlement of a debtor’s assets and liabilities within a limited frame of time.

This is Am Base's second bite at the litigation apple, its first bite having been taken in an action filed in the Delaware Chancery Court, see Am Base Corp. And defendant-appellee Lester Mantell has served as a Trustee of the Trust since its creation, had been a senior City officer before the Am Base spin-off, and served in several officer positions (including Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer) at Am Base from prior to 1985 until December 1996.

The relevant detail of this transaction was that City distributed the outstanding shares of Am Base to City's common stockholders.

A company considering a liquidating trust needs to determine whether it will be required to comply with the registration and reporting requirements under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.