Start Methods of dating trees

Methods of dating trees

Ice core sampling normally uses the assumption that the ring bands observed represents years.

Dendrochronology (or tree-ring dating) is the scientific method of dating tree rings (also called growth rings) to the exact year they were formed in order to analyze atmospheric conditions during different periods in history.

Dendrochronology is useful for determining the timing of events and rates of change in the environment (most prominently climate) and also in works of art and architecture, such as old panel paintings on wood, buildings, etc.

A tree's growth rate changes in a predictable pattern throughout the year in response to seasonal climate changes, resulting in visible growth rings.

Each ring marks a complete cycle of seasons, or one year, in the tree's life.

Trees undergo spurts in growth in the spring and summer months while becoming somewhat dormant in the fall and winter months.

When a tree is cut down, these periods are exhibited in a cross section of the trunk in the form of rings.

Many people assume that the dates scientists quote of millions of years are as reliable as our knowledge of the structure of the atom or nuclear power.